Monthly Archives: January 2018

  • Intel 8th gen

    The new generation: comparing Intel 8th gen with 7th gen

    Updated 23/01/2018

    We’re pleased to say we now have the latest Intel 8th generation processors and motherboards in stock! Now we’ve got our hands on the new tech, we’ve decided to explore exactly how this new generation of Core CPUs compares with its predecessor, the 7th gen Kaby Lake line, and why 8th generation is a bigger and better alternative.

    What does the 8th generation consist of?

    Intel’s 8th generation of desktop and mobile CPUs was officially announced last August during 2017’s total solar eclipse. Rather than an entirely new architecture, this instead consists of three microarchitectures evolved from the 7th gen Kaby Lake – the refreshed 14nm+ Kaby Lake-R, the 14nm++ Coffee Lake, and the yet-to-emerge 10nm Cannon Lake.

    What’s the difference?

    There are several key differences between Intel 8th and 7th gen, the most notable of which is the promised 40% increase in performance. This claim states that 8th gen Intel Core i7 and i5 processors demonstrate up to a 40% improvement, even when multitasking. This huge boost is due in part to the fact that 8th gen chips are no longer dual, but instead quad-core, which has afforded a 25% performance rise alone. This combined with design and manufacturing changes has lifted the 8th gen Core CPUs to that impressive 40% mark.

    Another significant change is the core count in each CPU. As we’ve seen with Coffee Lake, the core count for i7 and i5 processors has gone from 4 to 6, with an accompanying jump in threads, too, meaning the newer generations are much faster. In fact, according to Laptop Mag, 4-cored Kaby Lake-R can be up to 91% quicker, depending on the task. What this has meant, though, is a lower base clock for Kaby Lake-R due to Intel’s efforts to keep to a 15W TDP, but this is barely apparent in performance, thanks to higher clock speeds at Turbo.

    Beyond the core and performance increase, however, not a great amount has changed; the 8th generation line-up isn’t wildly different. What is evident, though, is that the surge in performance is substantial enough to set the 8th generation CPUs into a league over and above 7th gen.

    Conclusion

    While there isn’t an overwhelming amount of difference between Intel 8th and 7th gen, the new generation certainly holds its own when it comes to speed, accuracy, and performance. We’re really excited about what has been revealed to us of Intel’s 8th generation so far, particularly the Coffee Lake i7-8700k CPU, and can’t wait to see what’s yet to come from it as we head further into 2018.

    If you’re interested in a Rack or Mini PC containing Intel’s 8th generation CPUs, or would like to learn more about what 8th gen has to offer, speak to one of the team.

    Posted by: Geoff Undrell
    Posted in: News, Technical Articles

  • Coffee Lake Core i7-8700k

    We take a look at what Intel has been brewing: Coffee Lake

    Updated 11/01/2018

    Since its launch back in August, we’ve been on the lookout for news on Intel’s new 8th generation chip line. While we’ve seen our fair share of Kaby Lake-related talk, it’s only recently that news of their aptly codenamed “Coffee Lake” has started to surface. The new architecture uses a 14nm++ production process, stemming from its 14nm ancestor, Broadwell, and following on from Kaby Lake’s 14nm+ process. True to its name, Coffee Lake’s range of 8th generation processors packs some serious power, and has received notable praise for its performance.

    G2’s interest, though, lies particularly in the 8th gen Core i7-8700k processor. Boasting no less than 6 Hyper-Threaded cores and 12 threads, this CPU has been built with Intel Turbo Boost Technology 2.0, making it easily overclockable, jumping up to a 4.7GHz boost clock speed from a 3.7GHz base. Being unlocked, hence the tell-tale ‘k’ attached to its name, the CPU can really be pushed to reach its full potential, allowing users to custom tune their PCs for ultimate performance.

    Intel claims the Core i7-8700k will be their “best gaming desktop processor ever”.  It’s thanks to some seriously exciting specs that will also see the technology re-purposed into also sorts of different deployments, which is why it’s piqued our interest:

    • 6 cores, 12 threads
    • 4.7GHz boost clock
    • 3.7GHz base clock
    • 14nm++
    • 12MB cache memory
    • 95W Thermal Design Power (TDP)
    • 4K Support
    • Support for DDR4-2666 memory

    This leap in core count also extends across Intel’s 8th gen i5 and i3 processors, with 6 cores and 4 cores respectively. In addition to their hiked processing power, the 8th gen Coffee Lake CPUs are also purpose-built for speed, accuracy, and content creation. The key thing that makes them stand out, however, is affordability. When compared with AMD’s latest Ryzen processors, the 8th gen Core line-up is far more reasonable and accessible.

    The only sticking point we can see with Coffee Lake is the fact that it does require a new Z370 motherboard, as the CPUs are not compatible with older generations. Having said that, it does seem as though changing motherboards may well be worth doing, given the many benefits Coffee Lake offers.

    We’re still waiting on Intel to go beyond their desktop and mobile CPUs and launch the Core chips for enterprise in a Commercial variant so we can start getting them into our Rack and Mini PCs. It’s likely that these will be released within the first half of this year, so keep one eye on our blog for any updates.

    If you’d like to know more about what Intel’s 8th generation of CPUs has to offer, get in touch.

    Posted by: Geoff Undrell
    Posted in: News